May 14

The Prothonotary Warbler with Jarod Hitchings

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It isn't hard to tell that Jarod Hitchings is pretty keen on the Prothonotary Warbler (just look at that grin!), one of the most-loved migratory species in North America.  Jarod knows exactly when to expect his favourite migrants, and when they should be departing.  That's how birds, and the migratory, seasonal visitors can get under a bird-lovers' skin.

The nest-box assembly line, with the stunning PROW t-shirts. They are available through Bob Dolgan here

A suitable base material for a PROW nest box


Jarod directing the installation of a recycled carton nest box, ready for the PROW to arrive.

A very happy tenant of one of Jarod's carton nest boxes.text here


Jarod has found a suitable location for a carton PROW hotel

Jarod installing one of the carton nest boxes.

Unfortunately, Prothonotary Warblers are also Bird Strike victims. Fortunately, this bird survived the initial collision and recovered well enough to fly off after a period. Hopefully, it is still with us.

Watch the conversation (not safe for work or little kiddies)


Tags

Bird Strike, Flyways, Ilinois, Jarod Hitchings, migration, migratory birds, Prothonotary Warbler, USA, world migratory bird day


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